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CANADIAN HARVEST MUSTARD — A WHOLE, NATURAL PRODUCT

Canadian Harvest Mustard

Canadian Harvest Mustard – Prairie grown and prairie made, Brassica Mustard has been adding a wholesome elegance to home cooked and professionally crafted recipes for over ten years since that first jar was sealed back in 2001 and the company was established by co-founders chef Desmond Johnston and Karen Davis.

Delicious and versatile, Brassica adds and depth to any meal with its contemporary flavours prepared in a traditional style. The possibilities are endless with varieties ranging from a new European-style whole-grain mustard, to a special 10-year anniversary black pepper mustard, and Brassica’s ever-popular cranberry, horseradish, dill and roasted garlic flavours.

For great Canadian Harvest Mustard recipes ideas, check out chef Desmond Johnston’s creative suggestions, and more from our community of professional chefs who use Brassica in their kitchens.

Also if you could check out these websites and add some information:

Today, Canadian harvest mustard is the leading spice worldwide: more than 300,000 metric tons are produced each year. Although some mustard seed is pressed to produce an odorless fixed oil that is used in Indian and other cooking, most of it finds its way into the familiar condiment. Dijon still produces half the world’s prepared mustard—although much of the seed is imported from Canada!
It takes a lot of mustard plants to produce significant amounts of seed – a dozen plants yield enough for a couple of batches of prepared mustard.

http://www.herbcompanion.com/Herb-Profiles/The-Amazing-Mustard-Seed.aspx?page=2

Canada’s mustard industry began in a very small way, with a modest 40 hectares planted in southern Alberta in 1936, but productions was soon growing by leaps and bounds and by 1960 Canadian Mustard growers were planting 60,000 hectares!

One reason for the high quality of Canadian mustard is the hot, dry weather. In the case of yellow mustard, the Prairie day lengths and sunny summers contribute to a greater intensity of seed colour. (http://www.marquecanadabrand.agr.gc.ca/tools-utils/4512-eng.pdf)

http://www.ampc.montana.edu/briefings/briefing59.pdf